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Window Rock is a natural rock formation in Kenai Fjords National Park © Feng Wei Photography / Getty Images

Travelers interested in visiting Alaska now have to abide by a public health order with certain requirements such as presenting proof of a qualifying negative COVID-19 test.

Having taken effect on 6 June, 2020, the order contains mandates such as travelers completing and showing a Traveler Declaration Form – available for download from a related website – at check-in at entry point testing sites at airports and ferry terminals and in the communities at Alaska’s Canadian border crossings.

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“Travelers have a few options in regards to testing for COVID-19,” said Sarah Leonard, president and CEO of the Alaska Travel Industry Association. According to Leonard, visitors can produce a negative molecular-based test result within 72 hours of their departure to Alaska, or produce the same result within five days of departure and then get a second test when they arrive in Alaska. They would also have to minimize their interactions until the second test results come back negative.

“There’s also an option to take an initial test upon arrival in the state and self-quarantine until a second test confirms a negative result, but the state gave travelers some flexibility with these choices,” said Leonard.

Ketchikan, Alaska.Ketchikan, Alaska © sorincolac / Getty Images

With accommodations, Leonard noted that visitors who do need to self-quarantine can stay in any type of lodging enabling them to stay physically separated from others.

“Travelers also need to remember to check for any additional local city or borough restrictions at their destination, said Leonard. “For example, Anchorage has established additional protocols that minimize in-person interactions.”

More information can be found on this website.